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I decided to continue the material more or less seamlessly, and to call the result a second edition of COMPUTER rather than a separate book. There are no pictures this time, although I have many more to display. Errors that I am aware of in the first edition have been corrected, although I am sure there are others, and not a few in the new material.

The table of contents and the chronology have been extended.

What I wanted to do was to weave an exceedingly rich and complex fabric, with a warp of computer history but a filling, a woof, of wives and friends and travels. Think of my magnificently complicated life as a huge multi-dimensional data bank.

The totality is the autobiography - millions and millions of bytes.

S., and I consulted for the largest and best Japanese computer company.

And I had four wonderful wives, and a hundred lovely supporters, and terrific friends on five continents - and some very lively enemies.

Perhaps I could do for the computer trade what Casanova did for Venetian diplomacy? Or I could do a history: a history of the computer times I had lived through.

Providing this edition on CD/ROM, uncoded and uncompressed, means that chapters or sections of the book can be downloaded and subjected to full-text search. Later, for three amusing years, I was the top Federal computer honcho, and escaped to be editor of the major trade newspaper.

But I had to admit the idea was pretty far-fetched. Kurt Vonnegut did his satire on automation so well; I had gone to GE's Association Island [1955] and had sat under the elm that was transformed into a ruined oak at the end of his yarn.

As Schenectady became Ilion, so could Endicott become, say, Watsonville, and the shoe workers could parade past the IBM factory shouting "While you're thinking, we're drinking! But the themes would have to be spare, or the satire would be blunted.

The Index (which applies only through Chapter 25) is fully linked, and page anchors have been added through the end of Chapter 25, and correspond to the printed pages of the first edition (which has 24 chapters and no index).

Page numbers appear inline, representing the beginning of the corresponding printed page, as to press.

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